Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, known as the Kennedy–Kassebaum Act, was enacted by the 104th United States Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton in 1996. It became law on January 1, 1997. The Act, in part, specifies requirements that a Long-Term Care Insurance policy must meet in order that premiums paid may be deducted as medical expenses, and benefits paid not to be considered taxable income. Other areas of HIPAA cover medical privacy and protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs.